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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25854

Title: An Integrated Approach to Detecting Communicative Intent amid Hyperkinetic Movements in Children
Authors: McCarthy, Andrea
Advisor: Chau, Tom
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: Hyperkinetic Movement
Communication
Issue Date: 12-Jan-2011
Abstract: Hyperkinetic movement (HKM) can encumber nonverbal communication of preference. Caregiver and clinician interpretation of preference are recognized as a valuable but limited proxy translation. It is known that biomechanical signals can differentiate among movement patterns in various populations. We hypothesize that preference is encoded in HKM; to test this hypothesis we propose a unified approach to detect preference within HKM, fusing observational and quantitative techniques while incorporating caregiver and clinician perspectives. We illustrate this method through two case studies; in the first case preference is detectable by both visual (fair agreement) and accelerometer classification (68.5% accuracy) whereas in the second case preference is only detectable by accelerometer-based classification with 62.9% accuracy. The proposed procedure may enable researchers to effectively explore communicative movement patterns in children with HKM. The findings warrant further investigation into potential communicative patterns in HKM.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25854
Appears in Collections:Master

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