test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25858

Title: Verb Aspect and World Knowledge in the Mental Representation of Text: Evidence from Eye Movements
Authors: Mozuraitis, Mindaugas
Advisor: Daneman, Meredyth
Chambers, Craig
Department: Psychology
Keywords: Verb aspect
World knowledge
Reading
Language comprehension
Situation models
Eye movements
Issue Date: 12-Jan-2011
Abstract: Reading involves the dynamic construction of a mental model corresponding to the situation described in a text. This representation draws on the semantic and grammatical content of the text and also involves inferences for unstated information and the sequencing of events in time. In the current study, an eye-tracking methodology was used to explore the critical role of grammatical aspect in this process. The results showed that, following an event expressed in imperfective aspect, the reading of a necessarily later event was slowed compared to when the earlier event was expressed in perfective aspect. However, the effect depended on world knowledge—when the first event was typically of short duration, it did not evoke an "ongoing" interpretation to the same degree compared to when it was of long duration. The results highlight comprehenders' use of world knowledge and subtle grammatical cues in the representation of event information during on-line reading.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25858
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Mozuraitis_Mindaugas_M_201011_MA_thesis.pdf2.76 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft