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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25867

Title: Biochemical Investigation of the Bacteriophage Protein HK97 gp74
Authors: Moodley, Serisha
Advisor: Kanelis, Voula
Department: Chemistry
Keywords: Bacteriophage
HK97 gp74
Issue Date: 12-Jan-2011
Abstract: Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and propagate within bacteria by making use of the host’s biosynthetic machinery. With a global population of 1031, phages pose a significant influence on microbial populations. Studies of bacteriophage proteins can elucidate the influence that bacteriophages play on the evolution of bacteria, as well as, providing the basis for the use of phage proteins as possible therapeutics and bioengineering solutions. This study aims to investigate the structural and functional role of the HK97 phage protein gp74. Sequence alignments indicate that gp74 is related to homing HNH endonucleases. Homing endonucleases are predominantly double-stranded DNases, suggesting that gp74 mediates integration of phage genes into the host genome or may target foreign phage DNA. DNA digestion experiments with gp74 reveals that gp74 mediates non-specific double-stranded cleavage of lambda phage DNA and single strand cleavage of plasmid DNA. Our initial work demonstrates that HK97 gp74 is an HNH endonuclease.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25867
Appears in Collections:Master

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