test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25868

Title: Fabrication of Nickel Oxide Thin Films and Application thereof in Organic Electronics
Authors: Mordoukhovski, Leonid
Advisor: Lu, Zhenghong
Department: Materials Science and Engineering
Keywords: OLED
OPV
Organic Electronics
Organic Solar Cells
Nickel Oxide
Thin Films
Ozone oxidation
materials science
Issue Date: 12-Jan-2011
Abstract: This work investigates fabrication methods of nickel oxide thin films and their use in organic electronics. Two fabrication techniques were studied: UV-ozone oxidation of pure nickel films and reactive RF magnetron sputtering. The former was used to produce Ni/Ni2O3 bi-layer anodes to use as a substitute for the de facto standard ITO anode. OLEDs fabricated using Ni/Ni2O3 bi-layer anodes exhibited comparable device performance to standard ITO devices. UV-ozone oxidation was also used to fabricate Ni2O3 buffer layers for OPVs. Solar cells fabricated using Ni2O3 coated ITO exhibited an enhanced power conversion efficiency of up to 90%. RF magnetron sputtering was used to produce NiOx buffer layers with tunable conductivity and optical transparency for OPVs. Solar cells fabricated using NiOx coated ITO exhibited an enhanced power conversion efficiency of up to 60%. Nickel oxide films have been characterized with various techniques: sheet resistance measurements, optical transmission, XPS, UPS, AFM, and TEM.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25868
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Mordoukhovski_Leonid_201011_MASc_thesis.pdf1.81 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft