test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25901

Title: Assessment of the Functional Role of the NTR Domain of Complement Component C3 using a Homologous Dmain Exchange Approach
Authors: Rana, Amardeep
Advisor: Isenman, David
Department: Biochemistry
Keywords: Complement
NTR
C345C
C3
C5
Complement Receptor 1
factor H
factor B
Issue Date: 13-Jan-2011
Abstract: The complement system plays an important role in innate and adaptive immunity. Central to all complement activities is the function of complement component 3 (C3). C3 contains a C-terminal extension of ~150 residues known as the NTR (or C345C) domain. To address the role of the NTR domain in binding and functional activities of C3, a C3/C5 chimera was engineered, in which the NTR domain of C3 was replaced by the homologous domain of the closely related protein C5. Functionally, the C3(C5NTR) was devoid of classical pathway-dependent hemolytic activity and deficient in factor H- and CR1-dependent factor I cleavability. Direct binding SPR assays, using chip bound methylamine treated His6-tagged C3(C5NTR), showed a complete loss of C5 binding while retaining wild type binding with CR1, factor H and factor B. These results present the first evidence for a major C5 binding site within C3 NTR.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25901
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Rana_Amardeep_201011_MSc_thesis.pdf34.4 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft