test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25907

Title: Mass-independent Fractionation of Mercury Isotopes in Freshwater Systems
Authors: Rose, Carla
Advisor: Bridget, Bergquist
Department: Geology
Keywords: mercury isotopes
methylmercury
Issue Date: 13-Jan-2011
Abstract: Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg isotopes has the potential to track the environmental transport and fate of Hg. Herein we demonstrate that reducing both the frequency and intensity of light have a large effect on the expression and magnitude of MIF. This strongly supports the magnetic isotope effect as the mechanism behind MIF observed during aqueous photo-reduction of Hg(II) and MeHg. The ratios of MIF, KapDelta199Hg/KapDelta201Hg, were 1.00 ± 0.04 (2SE) for Hg(II) and 1.35 ± 0.16 (2SE) for MeHg respectively and did not change as incident radiation energy and magnitude of MIF diminished, suggesting the respective MIF pathways remained constant regardless of experimental conditions. Comparable amounts of total photo-reduction were shown to coincide with different magnitudes of MIF depending the wavelength light available for photo-reduction. This confirms there are multiple pathways for photo-reduction in freshwater reservoirs and indicates that quantitatively relating photo-reduction and MIF will be challenging.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25907
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Rose_Carla_H_201011_MASc_thesis.pdf2.79 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft