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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26380

Title: Gold Nanoparticles for Efficient Tumour Targeting: Materials, Biology & Application
Authors: Perrault, Steven
Advisor: Chan, Warren C. W.
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: Nanotechnology
Cancer
Tumour
Nanoparticle
Issue Date: 23-Feb-2011
Abstract: As of 2010, cancer remains the leading cause of death in Canada, and second in the United States of America. This is despite decades of research into development of chemotherapeutics and diagnostics. A number of major challenges have prevented new discoveries from translating into a reduction in mortality rates. One challenge is the poor efficiency with which anti-cancer agents (diagnostic contrast agents and therapeutics) reach deregulated cells in the body. Therefore, development of new methods and technologies for improving efficiency of delivery has been a focus of research. Nanoparticles are leading candidates for improving the efficiency of delivery because they can act as payload vehicles for anti-cancer agents, because it is possible to mediate their interaction with biological systems and thus their pharmaockinetics, and because they can exploit inherent vulnerabilities of tumours. This thesis describes the results from a series of research projects designed to progress our understanding of how nanoparticles behave in vivo, and how their design can be optimized to improve tumour targeting.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26380
Appears in Collections:Doctoral

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