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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26441

Title: Access via a Multiple Camera Tongue Switch for Children with Severe Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy
Authors: Leung, Brian
Advisor: Chau, Tom
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: paediatric rehabilitation
cerebral palsy
access technology
image processing
assistive technology
Issue Date: 2-Mar-2011
Abstract: Access technologies facilitate novel and alternative methods for individuals with disabilities to interact with their environment. Finding suitable access solutions for children with severe spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy can be difficult because of their poor motor control and targeting abilities due to spasticity at the limbs, neck, and head. In this research a multiple camera tongue switch was developed for a 7 year-old case study participant with severe spastic quadriplegia. Remotely via video, this system reacts to tongue protrusions as cues for single-switch access. Having multiple cameras mitigates targeting problems with the head that conventional single camera systems would present. Results of a usability experiment with the participant show that good sensitivity (82%) and specificity (80%) can be achieved with a non-contact tongue protrusion access modality for a user with spastic quadriplegia. Moreover, the experiment verified that the extra cameras improve utility of video-based access technologies for the target population.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26441
Appears in Collections:Master

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