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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26545

Title: Elder Care in an Emergency Department: How does Disparity in Practice Come to be?
Authors: Adam, Simon
Advisor: Burstow, Bonnie
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: Institutional ethnography
Dorothy Smith
Texts
Ruling Relations
Qualitative
Emergency Department
Elderly
Elder Care
Social Analysis
Work Organization
Institution
Health Care
Issue Date: 5-Apr-2011
Abstract: Elderly patients in the Emergency Department (ED) receive a different level of care than younger patients. The ED disproportionately deploys resources to serve the needs of the younger patient population, a decision that appears to be mediated by the acuity of the patient’s condition as defined by the institution. This study will seek to examine the institutional work processes by which this disparity in care is created. By looking at the needs of the elderly as ED patients and based on what they identify as important to them, this ethnographic study will examine the work organization of the nurses, physicians, and administrators in the ED. The goal of the research is, through the examination of the organization of work and the texts that mediate it, to explain the ruling relations through which elderly patients are subjugated as patients in the ED.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26545
Appears in Collections:Master

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