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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/27310

Title: Isolation of Extracellular Proteins from Ophiostoma ulmi and their Effect on Tensile Properties of Thermoplastic Starch
Authors: Khan, Sadia
Advisor: Christendat, Dinesh
Sain, Mohini
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: role of extracellular fungal proteins in bioplastic development
Issue Date: 24-May-2011
Abstract: Starch-derived bioplastics are an inexpensive, renewable and environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional petroleum-based plastics. Proteins secreted by Ophiostoma ulmi, were investigated for their application in bioplastic product. Proteins were isolated from fungal cultures by anion exchange chromatography and used to treat starch. Subsequently, plastic films were generated by solution casting, with glycerol as plasticizer. Tensile strength of the films was found to increase significantly compared to the control. The relative water holding capacity of the treated starch also decreased dramatically. Attempts to identify fungal proteins by MALDI-TOF MS/MS did not result in positive matches, mainly due to lack of fungal sequence information. Additionally, the effect of non-specific proteins resulted in a modest increase in tensile strength and a slightly greater effect on water absorption. Proteins secreted by O. ulmi were therefore implicated in improving properties of starch-based plastics. Investigation into the role of an extracellular polysaccharide is also suggested.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/27310
Appears in Collections:Master

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