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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/27343

Title: Characterization of BT3299: A Family GH31 Enzyme from a Prominent Gut Symbiont Bacteroides Thetaiotaomicron
Authors: Jacobs, Jenny-Lyn
Advisor: Rose, David
Department: Medical Biophysics
Keywords: Gut microbiota
Glycoside hydrolases
Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron
Family 31
Issue Date: 30-May-2011
Abstract: The human gut is host to a vast consortium of microorganisms, collectively referred to as the microbiota or microflora, which play important roles in health and disease. Current applications focus only on a single type of bacteria, which are not the most dominant numerically, and without detailed knowledge of the specific functions of these bacteria. A good indicator of the function of a bacterial species involves detailed analysis of its enzymes. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is one of the predominant bacterial species with a great representation of the carbohydrate processing enzymes, glycoside hydrolases in its proteome. This thesis reports the production and purification of one such enzyme, BT3299, suitable for kinetic and structural studies. The enzyme displayed a broad substrate specificity with a slight preference for 1-->3 and 1-->6 glycosidic linkages and longer chain saccharides. Future work will focus on structural analysis as an aid to the understanding of the enzyme function.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/27343
Appears in Collections:Master

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