test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/27354

Title: Health Care Service Provision Over the Palliative Care Trajectory
Authors: Masucci, Lisa
Advisor: Coyte, Peter C.
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: ambulatory and home-based care
palliative care
health services research
Issue Date: 31-May-2011
Abstract: Health system restructuring combined with the preferences of palliative care recipients to be cared for at home has lead to a shift in the delivery of care from the hospital to the home setting. An analysis was conducted on five main home-based palliative care health service components: home-based nurse visits, home personal support worker visits, home-based physician visits, ambulatory physician visits, and other ambulatory and home-based visits. First, we assessed the proportion of total cost associated with the main services at different time points over the palliative care trajectory. Second we examined the socio-demographic and clinical factors that predict the propensity and intensity of service use, using a two-part model. The results suggest that the greatest contributor to the total cost of home-based palliative care was personal support worker visits, followed by nurse visits. The regression analysis revealed that patient age as well as functional status most often predicted health service use.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/27354
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Masucci_Lisa_20113_MSc_thesis.pdf2.94 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft