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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29500

Title: Sharing professional experience: Its impact on professional development
Authors: Ross, John A.
Regan, Ellen
Keywords: Professional development
Knowledge sharing
Knowledge transfer
Knowledge management
Professional sharing
The learning to teach approach
The training approach
Recollective reflection
Dissonance
Synthesis
Experimentation
Integration
Case study
District consultants
Resource teachers
Change agents
Curriculum coordinators
Program advisors
Consultant Development Profile
In-service programs
Professional development programs
Dialogue
Issue Date: 1993
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Ross, J. A., & Regan, E. (1993). Sharing professional experience: Its impact on professional development. Teaching and Teacher Education, 9(1), 91-106. doi:10.1016/0742-051X(93)90017-B
Abstract: Provision for teachers to share professional experiences is a core element of contemporary in-service design, even though few systematic attempts to observe the impact of sharing on professional growth have been reported. An argument for the value of professional sharing was developed from a constructivist model of professional development. Data from an in-service program for district consultants (audio tapes of deliberations and pre/post interviews) were used to test two hypotheses about the effects of interrupting narratives. The first was supported: listening to descriptions of professional experience had a positive effect on the growth of listeners who interacted with narrators. There was some support, to a lesser degree, for the second: Professional sharing had a weak effect on the development of narrators, unless the reports were punctuated by metacognitions or challenged by other group members.
Description: The authors contributed equally to the writing of the article.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29500
ISSN: 0742-051X
Appears in Collections:Faculty (CTL)

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