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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29509

Title: The Expression Profile of KIAA0319-like in Chick Embryos and its Involvement in Cell Migration in the Developing Optic Tectum
Authors: Charish, Jason
Advisor: Monnier, Philippe
Department: Physiology
Keywords: cell migration
optic tectum
neuroscience
dyslexia
Issue Date: 23-Aug-2011
Abstract: Several genes thought to confer susceptibility to dyslexia have been identified, and the purpose of this study is to 1) determine the expression pattern of one of these gene products and 2) characterize the function of the product of one of these genes, namely KIAA0319-Like (KIAA0319L), using the developing chick visual system as a model. Whole mount in situ hybridization was performed for KIAA0319L on embryonic day (E)3 – E5 and in situ hybridization on sections was performed at later stages. Engineered microRNA (miRNA) constructs targeting KIAA0319L were prepared and their specificity and efficiency for knocking down KIAA0319L were tested. miRNAs were electroporated in E5 optic tecta (OT). Embryos were sacrificed at E12. OT were removed, sectioned and analyzed. Results demonstrate that KIAA0319L is expressed in the developing chick visual system. Knockdown of KIAA0319L in the OT results in abnormal migration indicating that KIAA0319L is necessary for this process.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29509
Appears in Collections:Master

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