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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29529

Title: Clonal Expansion of B and T lymphocytes Defines a Spectrum of Monoclonal Lymphocytosis
Authors: Memon, Sadaf
Advisor: Wang, Chen
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: Clonal lymphocytosis
Monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL)
Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Clonal T-cell lymphocytosis
Lymphocytosis
Issue Date: 23-Aug-2011
Abstract: Monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) has been recognized as a novel diagnostic condition. This study aims at the identification of clonal lymphocytosis in the patients with asymptomatic lymphocytosis. A total of 203 patients were evaluated for clonal B and T lymphocytosis by using flow cytometry and multiplex-PCR. Among them clonal B- or T-cells were detected in 54.2% of the cases, of which 38.4% were clonal B-cells and 15.8% were clonal T-cells cases. By immunophenotype, MBL was classified into the chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) type (21.7%) and non-CLL-type (7.4%). Flow cytometry analysis and cell counts were used to determine the size of clonal population, and the data indicate that MBL and CLL are present in a continuous spectrum of clonal expansion. The findings may contribute to the current understanding of MBL and evaluation of incidental lymphocytosis. Further studies are required to evaluate clonal progression as a precursor stage of lymphoid malignancy.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29529
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