test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29532

Title: Growth Factor Dependent Co-receptor Function of Neuropilins in Breast Carcinoma
Authors: Mohammed, Nada Shah
Advisor: Prud'homme, Gerald
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: breast cancer
cancer stem cells
Neuropilin
Growth factors
Issue Date: 23-Aug-2011
Abstract: Neuropilin (Nrp) overexpression is correlated with increased invasion and metastasis in many epithelial carcinomas including breast cancer. The exact molecular mechanism of how Nrp promotes cancer cell tumourigenicity is unknown. Nrp is a coreceptor for VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and also shown to activate TGF-beta on tumour cells. We hypothesize that binding of Nrp potentiates growth factor (GF) signalling and results in GF-dependent aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. In the current study, Nrp was shown to potentiate HGF signalling in vitro in MCF-7 cells by increasing phosphorylation of the MET receptor. However MDA-MB-231 cell line failed to show any differences after Nrp knockdown, due to constitutively activated MET. Nrp is also shown to increase the number and size of cancer stem cell (CSC) enriched mammospheres through NF-kB pathway activation. These results suggest a novel function of Nrp in CSCs and identify it as a potential target for effective cancer therapy.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29532
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Mohammed_Nada_S_201106_MSc_thesis.pdf2.77 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft