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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29549

Title: Oxidation of Organic Species in Ice
Authors: Gao, Shawna Shanshan
Advisor: Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.
Department: Chemistry
Keywords: ice chemisty
dicarboxylic acids
humic acids
snow photochemistry
OH radical
Arctic chemistry
photochemistry
organic films
Issue Date: 24-Aug-2011
Abstract: Oxidation of organic species, in particular dicarboxylic and humic acids, was investigated in ice. Products were analyzed by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry, ion and gas chromatography, and a Total Organic Carbon analyzer. Photolysis of succinic acid with H2O2, an OH precursor, produced malonic acid and malic acid, illustrating that diacids are subject to photochemical degradation in ice. First-order decay rate constants were an order of magnitude higher at room temperature (~23 °C) than in ice (-20 °C). A smaller difference was observed for malonic acid, a more soluble diacid, suggesting that partial segregation of H2O2 and succinic acid during freezing played an important role in the kinetics. VOCs, likely to be aldehydes and ketones, were produced from ice containing humic acid through heterogeneous ozonolysis and photooxidation which was enhanced by NO3-, an OH precursor. VOCs also formed from ice made from deionized water, likely through oxidation of organic contaminants.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29549
Appears in Collections:Master

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