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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29589

Title: Fabrication and Characterization of Nano-FET Biosensors for Studying Osteocyte Mechanotransduction
Authors: Li, Jason
Advisor: Sun, Yu
You, Lidan
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: NanoFET
nanowire
biosensor
osteocyte
mechanotransduction
nanomanipulation
MEMS
NEMS
bone
bone remodelling
Issue Date: 25-Aug-2011
Abstract: Nano-FET biosensors are an emerging nanoelectronic technology capable of real-time and label-free quantification of soluble biological molecules. This technology promises to enable novel in vitro experimental approaches for investigating complex biological systems. In this study, we first explored osteocyte mechanosensitivity under different mechanical stimuli and found that osteocytes are exquisitely sensitive to different oscillatory fluid flow conditions. We therefore aimed to characterize protein-mediated intercellular communication between mechanically-stimulated osteocytes and other bone cell populations in vitro to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of load-induced bone remodeling. To this end, we devised a novel nano-manipulation based fabrication method for manufacturing nano-FET biosensors with precisely controlled device parameters, and further investigated the effect of these parameters on sensor performance.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29589
Appears in Collections:Master

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