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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29606

Title: Anti-plasmodium Activity of Small Imidazolium-and Triazolium-based Compounds
Authors: Rodriguez, Eva Patricia
Advisor: Crandall, Ian E.
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: Plasmodium falciparum
Imidazolium salts
Triazolium salts
Malaria
antimalarial drugs
invasion
Issue Date: 25-Aug-2011
Abstract: In response to growing levels of resistance to currently used antimalarials, there is an urgent need to develop drugs that exhibit novel mechanisms to kill Plasmodium parasites. The objective of this study was to examine the antiparasitic activity of newly synthesized compounds based on imidazolium and triazolium rings. According to our structure/activity relationship studies the key components appear to be their positively charged rings and hydrophobic side groups, and bivalent compounds, which incorporate two positively charged rings, show even greater potency than monovalent compounds. Depending on the concentration used, our compounds appear to primarily inhibit intracellular parasite development or invasion into red blood cells. Selected compounds have been tested in vivo using a P. berghei ANKA murine model. Together, our findings demonstrate that small imidazolium- and triazolium-based compounds display both in vitro and in vivo activity through a novel mechanism of action that may involve inhibition of erythrocyte invasion.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29606
Appears in Collections:Master

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