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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29621

Title: Task Re-allocation Methodologies for Teams of Autonomous Agents in Dynamic Environments
Authors: Sheridan, Patricia Kristine
Advisor: Benhabib, Beno
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: on-line task allocation
autonomous agents
Issue Date: 25-Aug-2011
Abstract: Two on-line task re-allocation methodologies capable of re-allocating agents to tasks on-line for minimum task completion time in dynamic environments are presented herein. The first methodology, the Dynamic Nearest Neighbour (DNN) Policy, is proposed for the operation of a fleet of vehicles in a city-like application of the dial-a-ride problem. The second methodology, the Dynamic Re-Pairing Methodology (DRPM) is proposed for the interception of a group of mobile targets by a dynamic team of robotic pursuers, where the targets are assumed to be highly maneuverable with a priori unknown, but real-time trackable, motion trajectories. Extensive simulations and experiments have verified the DNN policy to be tangibly superior to the first-come-first-served and nearest neighbour policies in minimizing customer mean system time, and the DRPM to be tangibly efficient in the optimal dynamic re-pairing of multiple mobile pursuers to multiple mobile targets for minimum total interception time.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29621
Appears in Collections:Master

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