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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29623

Title: A Comparative Evaluation of Plastic Property Test Methods for Self-consolidating Concrete and Their Relationships with Hardened Properties
Authors: Shindman, Benjamin
Advisor: Panesar, Daman
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: self-consolidating concrete
SCC
plastic properties
filling ability
passing ability
segregation
stability
durability
test method
Issue Date: 25-Aug-2011
Abstract: Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is a special type of concrete that flows under its own weight and spreads readily into place while remaining stable. Although SCC technology has been rapidly progressing over the last 20 years and continues to develop, the relationships between the fresh, hardened and durability properties of SCC are not well documented. The focus of this investigation is twofold. Firstly, the use of SCC necessitates reliable and accurate characterization of material properties. A variety of laboratory test methods are used to evaluate SCC’s plastic properties. Recognizing that various test methods evaluate the same plastic properties, there is a need to critically investigate the adequacy and sensitivity of each test. Secondly, outcomes from this project are expected to advance the fundamental understanding of the interplay between the fresh properties of SCC and their implications on hardened properties and durability performance.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29623
Appears in Collections:Master

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