test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29651

Title: Pediatric Dentists’ Behaviour Management of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Authors: Zaretsky, Evan
Advisor: Sigal, Michael
Friedman, Clive
Judd, Peter
Titley, Keith
Locker, David
Department: Dentistry
Keywords: Autism
Dentistry
Behaviour Management
Issue Date: 29-Aug-2011
Abstract: This study assessed which behaviour management techniques, BMTs, pediatric dentists are using, and find effective in treating patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD and identified influences which contributed to their use. Surveys were mailed and emailed to 1669 members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Seven hundred eighty-nine (48.2%) completed surveys were returned. Nearly 60% of respondents treated children with ASD weekly or more frequently. Of the 23 listed BMTs, General Anaesthesia, Tell-Show-Do, Distraction, and Non-verbal Communication, were considered effective. Seventy percent of respondents were primarily users of classical BMTs. Pharmacological and classical techniques, are used frequently, but may not be effective. Time and costs limit the use of modern techniques. Cost efficiency and long-term patient management were the most influential factors in selecting a BMT; patient co-operation was the least influential. Pediatric dentists recognized a need for further education related to behaviour management of children with ASD.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29651
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Zaretsky_Evan_H_2011_MSc_thesis.pdf584.11 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft