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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29756

Title: Canadian Refugee Policy Paradigm Change in the 1990s: Understanding the Power of International Social Influence
Authors: Irvine, James Alexander
Advisor: Bertoldi, Nancy
Department: Political Science
Keywords: Canada
Refugee Policy
Global Goverment Networks
Socialization
Issue Date: 31-Aug-2011
Abstract: This dissertation explores the factors which contributed to a change in the paradigm that framed Canadian refugee policy over the course of the 1990s. This change is characterized in the dissertation as a shift from a refugee protection paradigm that dominated policy-makers’ thinking in the 1970s and 1980s, to a security-control paradigm by at the end of the 1990s. This change is puzzling because it occurred prior to the events of 9/11 rather than in response to them and because domestic motivations for change do not provide a complete explanation of the shift. The dissertation argues that although factors in the domestic and international environments may have enabled paradigm change, a more complete explanation of shift needs to consider the process through which Canadian policy-makers were socialized into a developing international norm. This process of international socialization occurred through bureaucrats’ international interaction in bilateral and Regional Consultative Processes akin to Anne-Marie Slaughter’s global government networks. Using data generated from primary document analysis and a series of interviews of key policy-makers this dissertation maps paradigm change over the two periods. This data is then used to provide evidence of the importance of bureaucratic socialization through a global government network for migration in explaining this change.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/29756
Appears in Collections:Doctoral

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