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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30026

Title: Effects of running records assessment on early literacy achievement: Results of a controlled experiment
Authors: Ross, John A.
Keywords: Effective schools
Effective schools research
Teacher effectiveness
Physical activities
Emergent literacy
Action research
Academic achievement
Reading achievement
Reading instruction
Teacher efficacy
Systematic classroom assessment
Assessment
Running records
Effective teachers
Teacher effectiveness
Student needs
Literacy programs
Student literacy
Teaching techniques
Instructional practices
Reading recovery
Issue Date: 2004
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Citation: Ross, J. A. (2004). Effects of running records assessment on early literacy achievement: Results of a controlled experiment. Journal of Educational Research, 97(4), 186-194. doi:10.3200/JOER.97.4.186-195
Abstract: Recent research on effective schools (e.g., Pressley et al., 2001) identified consistent associations between students’ literacy achievement and teacher practice. This study extended these correlational findings by conducting a controlled experiment to test the claims about one practice recommended by recent effective schools research, systematic classroom assessment, represented here as the use of running records to plan instruction. Schools assigned to the Running Records treatment outperformed schools assigned to a near-treatment condition (Action Research). After controlling for prior school achievement and collective teacher efficacy, the Running Records intervention accounted for 12% of the between-school variance in Reading and 7% in Writing, confirming the correlational finding from effective schools research.
Description: Corresponding author: Dr. John A. Ross, Professor and Field Centre Head, OISE/UT Trent Valley Centre, Box 719, Peterborough, ON K9J 7A1 jross@oise.utoronto.ca
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30026
ISSN: 0022-0671 [print]
1940-0675 [online]
Appears in Collections:Faculty (CTL)

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