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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30083

Title: Change in Child Health and Socioeconomic Status: Examining the Moderating Role of Differential Parenting
Authors: Browne, Dillon T.
Advisor: Jenkins, Jennifer M.
Department: Human Development and Applied Psychology
Keywords: parenting
socioeconomic status
health
development
Issue Date: 29-Nov-2011
Abstract: Inequality within the family (i.e. differential parenting) is associated with a variety of measures of child adjustment. To date there is no research examining the effects of this phenomenon on children’s physical health, or on the fashion in which this phenomenon may combine and interact with socioeconomic markers. The present study assessed 375 mothers and their children over a period of 18 months. Differential maternal negativity between siblings predicted change in child health, controlling for child gender, age, maternal education, income/assets, and absolute level of negativity in the household. The association between maternal education and change in child health was strongest when children were also exposed to high differential negativity, suggesting that these predictors combined in a cumulative fashion. Findings indicate that multiple forms of social disadvantage (i.e. between families and between siblings) can operate independently or in combination with one another to predict change in child health.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30083
Appears in Collections:Master
Master

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