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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30085

Title: On Reciprocity: Teaching and Learning with People who have Alzheimer's
Authors: Downie, Kathleen
Advisor: Knowles, J. Gary
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: Alzheimer's
adult learning
reciprocity
well-being
creativity
Issue Date: 29-Nov-2011
Abstract: The initial intention of this arts-informed research study was to implement art classes for people with Alzheimer‟s disease, and to examine its impact upon new learning at cognitive, procedural and affective levels of experience. While these goals persist – indeed adult educational theory and quality of life are central to this thesis – the research focus gradually shifted from a constructivist view of the Alzheimer‟s learner to a phenomenological view of the relationship between teacher and student. Its power to facilitate the growth of reciprocity and bolster identity within the learning context, whether one-to-one or in small group settings, became more apparent as the research progressed. This revealed the potential of arts-based educational programs to build mutual trust and reciprocity with and among the participants. In turn, these qualities contributed to the expression of positive feelings, improved self-esteem,and communication in people with Alzheimer‟s.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30085
Appears in Collections:Master

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