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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30086

Title: What's in a Note? Sentiment Analysis in Online Educational Forums
Authors: Fakhraie, Najmeh
Advisor: Hewitt, James
Department: Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
Keywords: Sentiment Analysis
Communication
Threaded Forums
Online education
Computational Linguistics
Text Analysis
Issue Date: 29-Nov-2011
Abstract: This multi-disciplinary study examines the linguistic characteristics which influence communication and social interaction in computer-mediated communication (CMC). We begin by conducting a qualitative data analysis on a group of graduate students taking online courses. Through this, we look more closely at their perception of social interaction in their online learning environment (Knowledge eCommons). We then take individual student notes and analyze their linguistic characteristics. We look at the emotional cues in notes, the use of factual, objective language and other linguistic features. We study these notes through the use of sentiment analysis methodologies – which will be explained in detail in the first and second chapter. We have proposed a method for deducing note objectivity and have computed reliability testing of this method. Our analyses show that there is a high correlation between the use of objective language in a note and the value that students place on that note.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30086
Appears in Collections:Master

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