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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30106

Title: Imagining Glace Bay: An Exploration of Family, History and Place
Authors: Siegel, Amy
Advisor: Knowles, J. Gary
Cole, Ardra
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: arts-informed methodology
Glace Bay
Cape Breton
life history
unions
labour movement
critical consciousness
social justice
poetic transcription
poetry
visual inquiry
photography
narrative
Issue Date: 29-Nov-2011
Abstract: This is an inquiry that explores both then and now. Father and Daughter. Temporality and Geography. Within these pages stories are used to explore my family’s present and past; migration, settlement, memory, experience and connection to place – Glace Bay, a village on Cape Breton Island. Through narrative, poetry and photography, the contrasting experiences of having lived in Glace Bay in the past, and the struggle to connect with Glace Bay in the present, and future, are explored. Finally, within this manuscript I examine the impact of my father’s stories and I identify storytelling as an important factor in developing a critical consciousness. My father inspired my sense of social justice at a young age and the impetus for this project was not just to document his stories for the sake of posterity, but also to exemplify the way consciousness is cultivated and passed down; across generations, despite changing landscapes, through story.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30106
Appears in Collections:Master
Master

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