test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30116

Title: Quantitative In Vivo Assessment of Tumour Vasculature-targeted Liposomes
Authors: Dunne, Michael
Advisor: Allen, Christine
Department: Pharmaceutical Sciences
Keywords: Molecular Imaging
Drug Development
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2011
Abstract: Targeting angiogenic vasculature has been validated as a viable approach for cancer imaging and therapy. The tumour vasculature-specific ligand asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR) peptide targets the isoform of aminopeptidase N (CD13) expressed on endothelial cells lining angiogenic vessels. CD13 has become widely recognized as a rational target for therapeutic development and several NGR-conjugated agents are now in pre-clinical and clinical development. In the current study, a CT image-based approach is used to evaluate the in vivo performance of several NGR-conjugated liposome formulations that vary in terms of NGR density and PEG spacer arm length. Indeed, for the first time it is demonstrated that CT imaging can be used for quantitative and longitudinal assessment of the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of an actively targeted liposome formulation. In comparison to conventional methods, CT imaging enables visualization of the intratumoural distribution of liposomes and quantification of the fraction of tumour occupied by the vesicles over time.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30116
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Dunne_Michael_201011_MSc_thesis.pdf954.69 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft