test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30119

Title: Sodium Ascorabe as a Potent Stimulator of Elastic Fiber Production
Authors: Hyunjun, Kim
Advisor: Hinek, Aleksander
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: Elastic Fiber Production
Sodium Ascorbate
IGF-1 Receptor
Loeys-Dietz Syndrome
Williams-Beuren Syndrome
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2011
Abstract: The complicated problem of efficient stimulation of elastic fiber production in already developed human tissues has not yet been solved. The present study introduces sodium ascorbate (SA) as a stimulator of elastogenesis in cultures of different cell types including fibroblasts isolated from patients with elastopathy genetic diseases. We then elucidated mechanisms of elastogenic action of SA. SA exercises its net elastogenic effect only after being actively transported into the cell interior through two separate mechanisms. These are the “fast effect,” which reflects the greater stability of intracellular tropoelastin, and the “late effect,” which reflects the true enhancement of the elastin gene expression occurring after SA-induced activation of c-src tyrosine kinase and the consecutive phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor, which triggers the downstream signals leading to activation of the elastin gene expression. In conclusion, for the first time we have established that SA is a potent stimulator of elastic fiber production.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30119
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Kim_Hyunjun_20113_MSc_thesis.pdf4.43 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft