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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30141

Title: System-level Structural Reliability of Bridges
Authors: Elhami Khorasani, Negar
Advisor: Gauvreau, Douglas Paul
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: Bridge engineering
Robustness
Reliability analysis
Redundancy
Two-girder and two-web bridges
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2011
Abstract: The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate that two-girder or two-web structural systems can be employed to design efficient bridges with an adequate level of redundancy. The issue of redundancy in two-girder bridges is a constraint for the bridge designers in North America who want to take advantage of efficiency in this type of structural system. Therefore, behavior of two-girder or two-web structural systems after failure of one main load-carrying component is evaluated to validate their safety. A procedure is developed to perform system-level reliability analysis of bridges. This procedure is applied to two bridge concepts, a twin steel girder with composite deck slab and a concrete double-T girder with unbonded external tendons. The results show that twin steel girder bridges can be designed to fulfill the requirements of a redundant structure and the double-T girder with external unbonded tendons can be employed to develop a robust structural system.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30141
Appears in Collections:Master

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