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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30164

Title: Characterization of Executive Dysfunction in Real World Tasks: Analysis of Behaviours Performed during Completion of the Multiple Errands Test
Authors: Arshad, Sidrah
Advisor: Dawson, Deirdre R.
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: Rehabilitation
Stroke
Multiple Errands Test
Assessment
Executive Dysfunction
Event Recording
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2011
Abstract: This study furthers our understanding of the impact of executive dysfunction on everyday activities in stroke survivors. A classification system was developed to analyze a wide range of behaviours performed by 14 stroke survivors and 12 matched controls on the Baycrest Multiple Errands Test, a task requiring participants to buy specific items and collect certain information on the main floor of the hospital. The event recorder was used to code the occurrences and frequencies of behaviours performed by participants. Results demonstrated that participants with stroke performed significantly more task specific relevant inefficient behaviours (p < .05) and non-task specific irrelevant behaviours (p < .10) compared to controls. This study indicates the importance of performing a detailed analysis of behaviours performed to better understand the impact of ED in everyday life.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30164
Appears in Collections:Master

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