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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30170

Title: The Use of Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Promote Bone Healing in a Defect Model in the Rat Femur
Authors: Atesok, Kivanc
Advisor: Schemitsch, Emil H.
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: Fracture Healing
Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPC)
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2011
Abstract: The objective of this project was to evaluate the effects of local endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) therapy on bone regeneration in a segmental defect in the rat femur. Animals from the EPC-treated (N=28) and control (N=28) groups were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3, and 10 weeks post-operatively. Bone healing was evaluated with radiographic, histological, and micro computed tomography (micro-CT) scans. Radiographically; mean scores of the EPC group at 1, 2, and 3 weeks were significantly higher compared to control group. At 10 weeks, all the animals in the EPC group had complete union (7/7), but in the control group none achieved union (0/7). Histologically, specimens from EPC-treated animals had abundant new bone formation compared to controls. Micro-CT assessment showed significantly improved parameters of bone healing for the EPC group compared to control group. In conclusion, local EPC therapy significantly enhanced bone regeneration in a segmental bone defect in rat femur.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30170
Appears in Collections:Master

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