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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30519

Title: Systems Development, Assembly and Testing, and Mission Operations for Nanosatellites in the CanX Program
Authors: Bradbury, Laura M.
Advisor: Zee, Robert E.
Department: Aerospace Science and Engineering
Keywords: nanosatellite
systems development
Issue Date: 5-Dec-2011
Abstract: The Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment (CanX) program at the University of Toronto's Space Flight Laboratory provides rapid, cost effective access to space through the use of micro- and nanosatellites. The primary focus of this thesis is the development of the CanX-4/-5 nanosatellite mission, which is intended to demonstrate precise, autonomous formation flying. This involves the development of nominal and contingency operations, system budgets, and requirements to produce a complete system architecture. Also described is the assembly, integration, and testing of flight hardware for this mission. In addition, this thesis addresses the on-orbit operation of CanX-2 and CanX-6/NTS, as it relates to operations planning for CanX-4/-5. The ground station operations for these two nanosatellite missions are described, with particular focus on payload operations and contingencies resulting from on-orbit anomalies. This experience is then related to the development of the CanX-4/-5 ground station software architecture.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30519
Appears in Collections:Master

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