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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30521

Title: Involvement of Primary Care Providers in the Care of Hospitalized Patients
Authors: Brener, Stacey Sarah
Advisor: Bell, Chaim
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: Primary Care
Continuity of Care
Quality of Care
Health Services Utilization
Issue Date: 5-Dec-2011
Abstract: This study examined the potential impact on processes of care and patient outcomes upon exposure of supportive and concurrent care provided by primary care providers (PCPs) to their hospitalized patients. A secondary objective was to describe the PCPs who conduct these services, and the patients who receive them. There was a marked, observable trend that PCP visits to their hospitalized patients is on the decline (dropped 10% between 2003 and 2009). The patients who received in-hospital visits from their PCPs had more disease burden and were hospitalized longer than the control group. Patients who received and in-hospital visit from their PCP were more likely to receive home care services and PCP visits post-discharge [adjusted OR 1.20 (95% CI 1.12-1.28)]. They were also less likely to experience the composite outcome of death, hospital readmission, or emergency department visit [aOR 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98)].
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30521
Appears in Collections:Master

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