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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30529

Title: Antihypertensives and Hip Fracture Risk in Community-dwelling Elderly: A Self-controlled Case Series Analysis
Authors: Butt, Debra Ann
Advisor: Glazier, Richard H.
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: antihypertensives
hip fracture
Issue Date: 5-Dec-2011
Abstract: Antihypertensive drugs can cause hypotension in the elderly and such an effect may lead to fall injuries. This thesis examined the association between antihypertensive drugs and hip fracture risk among elderly patients during the initiation of monotherapy. This population-based self-controlled case series study used healthcare administrative databases to identify Ontario residents aged ≥ 66 years with a first prescription for a thiazide diuretic, angiotension II converting-enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin II receptor antagonist, calcium channel blocker or beta-adrenergic blocker. A cohort of newly treated hypertensive elderly was then linked to the occurrence of hip fractures from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2009. We found that hypertensive elderly initiated on an antihypertensive drug had a 43% increased risk of having a hip fracture during the first 45 days of treatment, IRR 1.43 (95% CI 1.19-1.72). Initiating antihypertensive drugs in community-dwelling elderly should be approached with caution due to increased fracture risk.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30529
Appears in Collections:Master

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