test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30552

Title: Better the Devil We Know: How Sociology Informs the Debate Over Antidumping Laws
Authors: Chow, Cherrine
Advisor: Fadel, Mohammad
Department: Law
Keywords: Antidumping
Sociology
Law
Policy
Issue Date: 6-Dec-2011
Abstract: Trade and other governmental policy decisions are frequently made based on neoclassical economic theory, which in turn is based on simplifying assumptions that result in unrealistic predictions. In this thesis, I argue that sociology is an important social science that can help to inform economic theory in policy-making. Understanding how social relations affect market actors and institutions is crucial, as markets are themselves composed of social relationships. I present an example using antidumping regulations. Economic scholars have argued that antidumping laws should be abolished based on pure economic theory. I argue that, from a sociological perspective, antidumping laws serve to provide a necessary stabilizer for markets, resulting in controlled competition and greater trade liberalization. Such laws should therefore be maintained.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30552
Appears in Collections:Master

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Chow_Cherrine_C_201111_LLM_thesis.pdf375.72 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft