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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30569

Title: Needs Assessment, Knowledge Translation and Barriers to Implementing EEG Monitoring Technology in Critical Care
Authors: Davies-Schinkel, Corrine
Advisor: Fowler, Robert
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: EEG
Critical Care
Knowledge Translation
Survey
Issue Date: 7-Dec-2011
Abstract: Background: The neurological examination in critically ill patients is limited due to decreased level of consciousness and sedating medications. Electroencephalography (EEG) can be used to monitor brain injury; however, availability is limited. Methods: To determine the perceived need for EEG monitoring in the ICU and its current availability, we used rigorous methodology to develop and disseminate a survey to 199 Canadian critical care physicians. Results: Of 103 (52%) respondents (77% academic practice; 83% adult focus), 75% stated EEG monitoring should be a standard of care; yet, 75.5% were unable to obtain an EEG in an optimal timeframe. Technology under-use was exacerbated during non-standard working hours and greater in adult institutions. Perceived barriers to optimal care were lack of EEG technicians, physicians to interpret EEG and finances. Conclusion: Sub-optimal availability of EEG represents an important gap in the care of neurologically injured patients. Specific barriers represent targets for quality improvement.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30569
Appears in Collections:Master
Master

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