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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30605

Title: Facilitatory and Inhibitory Effects of Implicit Spatial Cues on Visuospatial Attention
Authors: Ghara Gozli, Davood
Advisor: Pratt, Jay
Department: Psychology
Keywords: visual attention
perceptual symbol systems
Issue Date: 7-Dec-2011
Abstract: Previous work suggests that both concrete (e.g., hat, shoes) and abstract (e.g., god, devil) concepts with spatial associations engage attentional mechanisms, affecting subsequent target processing above or below fixation. Interestingly, both facilitatory and inhibitory effects have been reported to result from compatibility between target location and the meaning of the concept. To determine the conditions for obtaining these disparate effects, we varied the task (detection vs. discrimination), SOA, and concept type (abstract vs. concrete) across a series of experiments. Results suggest that the nature of the concepts underlies the different attentional effects. With abstract concepts, facilitation was observed across tasks and SOAs. With concrete concepts, inhibition was observed during the discrimination task and for short SOAs. Thus, the particular perceptual and metaphorical associations of a concept mediate their subsequent effects on visual target processing.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30605
Appears in Collections:Master

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