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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30631

Title: Ecological Factors in Eemotion Recognition using Physiological Signals
Authors: Hung, Delbert
Advisor: Biddiss, Elaine
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: emotion recognition
physiological signals
IAPS
Issue Date: 8-Dec-2011
Abstract: To address the feasibility of ambulatory emotion recognition, characteristics of biosignals were compared between sitting and controlled walking using different stimulus modalities. Emotional stimulus items were drawn from the International Affective Pictures System and International Affective Digitized Sounds libraries to elicit five basic emotions. To assess which emotion was elicited, participants (n=15) completed self-report scales using the Self-Assessment Manikin and discrete emotion ratings following the presentation of each stimulus item. Autonomic activity was monitored using electrocardiogram, electrodermal activity, and thoracic and abdominal respiration. Multivariate analysis of variance was employed to test for differences in biosignal features and supervised classifiers were trained to predict the elicited emotion using physiological data. The study revealed differences between sitting and walking states but no effect was found for stimulus modality. Self-reported emotions were poorly predicted using our methodology and a discussion of potential directions and recommendations for future research was presented.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30631
Appears in Collections:Master

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