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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30643

Title: Epidemiology of Nosocomial Pneumonia in Adults Hospitalized in Canadian Acute Care Facilities
Authors: Johnston, Barbara
Advisor: McGeer, Allison
Department: Dalla Lana School of Public Health
Keywords: epidemiology
nosocomial pneumonia
nosocomial infections
outcomes
Issue Date: 8-Dec-2011
Abstract: Background: Nosocomial pneumonia (NP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe the epidemiology of NP in adult patients hospitalized in Canadian acute care facilities and identify prognostic indicators for death. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 114 patients with NP admitted to hospitals that participated in a 2002 Canadian point prevalence survey. Results: A high proportion of NP patients had a rapidly or ultimately fatal underlying illness. NP in non-intensive care unit (ICU) patients accounted for the larger proportion of these infections.There was no mortality difference between patients with and without ventilator-associated NP, or with and without ICU-acquired NP. Delayed initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy was associated with a poorer outcome. Discussion: Strategies that result in the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy should be investigated in an effort to reduce NP-associated mortality.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30643
Appears in Collections:Master

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