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Kommos >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/3071

Title: Kommos in Southern Crete: an Aegean barometer for east-west interconnections
Authors: Shaw, Joseph W.
Keywords: Excavations (Archaeology) - Greece - Kommos (Crete)
Issue Date: 1998
Publisher: The University of Crete and the A.G. Leventis Foundation
Citation: Shaw, Joseph W. "Kommos in Southern Crete: an Aegean barometer for east-west interconnections". in Eastern Mediterranean: Cyprus-Dodecanese-Crete, 16th-6th cent. B.C., Rethymnon Conference of May 1996, Athens, 1998: 13-27. (Editors: Vassos Karageorghis and Nikolaos Stampolidis).
Abstract: This Cretan harbour-town, like Ugarit or Enkomi, can serve as a focus for study of east-west connections. At Kommos, now familiar to many, its interconnections cover the chronological spectrum of the Conference. The two major periods are Minoan and Greek. For the Middle and Late Bronze Age, there are large civic buildings, at least partially designed for storage, bordered by a town. The first is a large MM civic building, much destroyed. The second is Late Minoan I Building T, palatial in character, with a large central court. The third, LM IIIA2/IIIB Building P, with broad galleries, may have been used to store ships. Our chief evidence for interconnections during MM and LM, aside from ingot fragments from Cyprus, is ceramic, in particular pottery from Cyprus, Egypt, Italy and/or Sardinia, and Syria/Palestine. For the period 1000-600 B.C., when a rural sanctuary was in use, our evidence is also mainly ceramic (Phoenician and East Greek), but an actual built structure, and graffiti on local pottery, witness foreign presence.
Description: 17 p. : ill. - This article is not intended for distribution, but for personal use only. Anyone wanting to use the article for coursework or any other purpose must obtain copyright permission from the Archaeological Institute of America. - This article has been scanned and reformatted by the T-Space Digitization Project Assistant. If a researcher is interested in referencing this work, it is recommended that the citation listed above be consulted, as the page numbers of the PDF file do not match those of the original publication.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/3071
Appears in Collections:Journal articles, conference papers and book chapters

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