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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31289

Title: Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of a Blended-wing-body Aircraft Configuration
Authors: Kuntawala, Nimeesha B.
Advisor: Zingg, David W.
Department: Aerospace Science and Engineering
Keywords: aerodynamic shape optimization
blended-wing-body
computational fluid dynamics
computational aerodynamics
aerodynamics
Issue Date: 12-Dec-2011
Abstract: Increasing environmental concerns and fuel prices motivate the study of alternative, unconventional aircraft configurations. One such example is the blended-wing-body configuration, which has been shown to have several advantages over the conventional tube-and-wing aircraft configuration. In this thesis, a blended-wing-body aircraft is studied and optimized aerodynamically using a high-fidelity Euler-based flow solver, integrated geometry parameterization and mesh movement, adjoint-based gradient evaluation, and a sequential quadratic programming algorithm. Specifically, the aircraft is optimized at transonic conditions to minimize the sum of induced and wave drag. These optimizations are carried out with both fixed and varying airfoil sections. With varying airfoil sections and increased freedom, up to 52% drag reduction relative to the baseline geometry was achieved: at the target lift coefficient of 0.357, a drag coefficient of 0.01313 and an inviscid lift-to-drag ratio of 27.2 were obtained.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31289
Appears in Collections:Master

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