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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31306

Title: The Effect of Acute Eccentric Treadmill Running on NF-κB Activation and HSP72 Content in Skeletal Muscle from Late Middle-aged Rats
Authors: Lewis, Evan
Advisor: Amara, Catherine
Department: Exercise Sciences
Keywords: aging
exercise
muscle
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2011
Abstract: Eccentric exercise causes skeletal muscle damage, yet the acute cellular responses post-exercise have yet to be fully elucidated. To better understand the post-exercise response, heat shock protein (HSP) 72 content and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation where examined in Adult (A; 6 month) and Late middle-aged (LMA; 24 month) Fischer 344xBrown Norway rats. Animals were randomly divided into five groups (n=6): non-exercising controls (C), level (L) or eccentric (ECC) (-16°) running at 16m.m-1 and killed immediately post-exercise (0), 48 hours post-exercise (48). Following ECC, vastus intermedius (VI) from A and LMA showed more damage compared to L exercise. Neither age-group had significantly increased VI HSP72 content compared to C. Pooled results founded increased HSP72 content in ECC-48 compared to C (p<0.02). NF-κB activation in the VI was lower in LMA (p<0.001) and unchanged in WG when compared to AC. These findings suggest HSP72 is increased following eccentric exercise in the VI.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31306
Appears in Collections:Master

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