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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31324

Title: Conductive Nanocrystalline Cellulose Polymer Composite Film as a Novel Mediator in Biosensor Applications
Authors: Lee, Andrew Dong-Hyun
Advisor: Yan, Ning
Department: Forestry
Keywords: Glucose Sensor
NCC-PPY
poly pyrrole
nanocrystalline cellulose
biosensor
interdigitated array electrode
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2011
Abstract: Recent biosensors using glucose oxidase enzyme to detect glucose (“blood sugar”) were made with intrinsic conducting polymers such as poly pyrrole (PPY) to mediate the reaction. PPY coated electrodes were difficult to employ via eletropolymerization because PPY is only soluble in solvents potentially damaging to enzymes. Nano crystalline cellulose – poly pyrrole (NCC-PPY) colloid circumvents this by forming natural, enzyme compatible, and hydrophilic films mechanically bound to electrodes using easy-to-disperse colloids. NCC-PPY was studied as mediator to investigate use in biosensor applications. Using NCC-PPY film casted on microfabricated interdigitated electrodes, a glucose biosensor with sensitivity factor of 20 was achieved. NCC-PPY showed enhanced catalysis with no enzyme inactivation and a total current of 2mA. Enhanced sensitivity was attributed to resistance changes of doped PPY, redox mediation, and compatibility of cellulose with enzyme.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31324
Appears in Collections:Master

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