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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31355

Title: Circulating Microparticles in Response to Decompression Stress
Authors: McKillop, Adam
Advisor: Scott, Thomas
Department: Exercise Sciences
Keywords: microparticles
decompression stress
flow cytometry
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2011
Abstract: The effect of decompression stress on circulating microparticles (MPs) from leukocytes (LMP), platelets (PMP), and endothelial cells (EMP) was investigated in fifteen male naval clearance divers. Venous blood samples were obtained 30 min before and 75 min after exposure to 81msw for 20 min. MPs were isolated by differential centrifugation and immunophenotyped using multiparameter flow cytometry. Venous gas emboli (VGE) were assessed using Doppler ultrasound every 40 min post-dive and subsequently graded using the Kisman Integrated Severity Score (mean KISS=21.92, indicating moderate level of VGE). Following the dive there was increased expression of CD41a, CD106, CD62P and CD31 on MPs, while CD45 and CD141 expression decreased. A positive correlation was found between KISS and CD41a expression post-dive. These results indicate that decompression stress activated platelets, producing PMPs and resulting in potential vascular disruption or injury. The inclusion of MP measures in future DCS-related research may help identify biomarkers of DCS.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31355
Appears in Collections:Master

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