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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31357

Title: Assessing Primary Care Physicians’ Attitudes Towards Adoption of an Electronic Tool to Support Cancer Diagnosis
Authors: Moeinedin, Fatemeh (Marjan)
Advisor: Wiljer, David
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: Cancer Care
e-Health
Physicians
Adoption
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2011
Abstract: The objective of this study was to assess Primary Care Physicians’ attitudes towards adoption of the Diagnostic Assessment Program-Electronic Pathway Solution (DAP-EPS), an electronic tool for improving cancer diagnostic processes. The implementation of DAP-EPS is a provincial activity supported by Cancer Care Ontario in collaboration with the Canadian Cancer Society. We conducted an online survey of Ontario PCPs. To guide our study, we used an integrated theoretical framework combining the Technology Acceptance Model and Diffusion of Innovation. Study results suggested a strong influence of perceived usefulness of the DAP-EPS tool on physicians’ attitudes towards adoption of the tool. The results also found that perceived usefulness was more important than perceived ease-of-use within the PCP context. The study revealed that perceived usefulness is the main predictor of physicians’ attitudes. The findings also suggested that the management and implementation team should emphasize the usefulness of the DAP-EPS to increase adoption among PCPs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31357
Appears in Collections:Master

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