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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31361

Title: Chemistry and Corrosion Mechanisms of Steels Embedded in High-density Slag Concrete for Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel
Authors: Nadarajah, Parthiban
Advisor: Newman, Roger C.
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: nuclear
corrosion
used fuel
chemical engineering
concrete
slag
nuclear waste management
steel
sulfide
thiosulfate
cement
GGBFS
steel corrosion
radioactive waste
ion chromatography
electrochemistry
microscopy
impedance
OPC
mortar
sulfate
magnetite
hematite
aggregates
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2011
Abstract: The chemistry and corrosion mechanisms associated with reduced sulfur compounds such as calcium sulfide, present in ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBFS), have been studied in high-density concrete, mortar and simulated pore-water environments. The high-density concrete and mortar samples were produced to replicate the high-density GGBFS concrete, in the dry storage containers (DSCs), used for radiation shielding from used nuclear fuel. Electrochemical measurements on embedded steel electrodes in high-density GGBFS concrete and mortar samples, showed that sulfide is capable of consuming oxygen to create a stable, reducing environment, though not in all cases, and the high-frequency electrolyte resistance increases with hydration time. Ion chromatography on simulated pore-water environments determined that thiosulfate is quite kinetically stable as a sulfide oxidation product and magnetite is capable of oxidizing sulfide. Microscopy has also been used to provide visual evidence of GGBFS hydration and elemental quantification of the hydrating microstructure in different environments.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31361
Appears in Collections:Master

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