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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31370

Title: Characterization of the Interface between the Annulus Fibrosus and the Vertebral Bone.
Authors: Nosikova, Yaroslavna
Advisor: Kandel, Rita A.
Santerre, J. Paul
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: Annulus fibrosus
cartilage endplate
collagen
vertebral bone
alkaline phosphatase
mineralization
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2011
Abstract: Replacing a diseased disc with a tissue engineered disc has the potential to restore normal spinal biomechanics. However, recreating the interface between annulus fibrosus (AF) and vertebral bone (VB) will be necessary to facilitate proper function of the implant in vivo. This study characterizes the native bovine AF-VB interface and assesses adult human discs. The AF insertion site in humans and cows is uniquely differentiated from other soft tissue-bone interfaces, as AF collagen fibers anchor into the calcified region of vertebral endplate through a zone of hyaline cartilage and have a different organization in inner and outer AF. Mineralization-associated proteins are present in this region and the chondroid tissue undergoes calcification over time. Based on these observations an in vitro AF culture system was developed and demonstrated that AF cells can induce mineralization. Understanding mechanism(s) regulating AF mineralization will help develop conditions to ensure proper integration of bioengineered AF.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31370
Appears in Collections:Master

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