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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31374

Title: Paleoecological and Carbon Accumulation Dynamics of a Fen Peatland in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Northern Ontario, from the Mid-Holocene to Present
Authors: O'Reilly, Benjamin Cody
Advisor: Finkelstein, Sarah A.
Department: Geography
Keywords: Northern Peatland Paleoecology
Peatland Carbon Accumulation
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2011
Abstract: Pollen assemblages, peat humification and carbon:nitrogen stratigraphy were examined at high resolution in a core from a fen peatland in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Northern Ontario, to interpret the factors that drive long-term peatland dynamics. Subtle changes in the vegetation community are evident over the record, suggesting both allogenic and autogenic influences, but a fen community appears to have been resilient to external perturbations including isostatic rebound and hydroclimatic changes between 6400 and 100 years BP. Paleoclimatic reconstructions from the fossil pollen assemblages indicate that precipitation increased 3000 years BP at the end of the Holocene Thermal Maximum, and that carbon accumulation in the fen was controlled more by effective surface moisture (precipitation) than by temperature. The pollen record suggests changes over the past century, including increases in shrub Betula, Alnus, Ambrosia, and Cyperaceae and a decrease in Sphagnum spores, consistent with the observed Pan-Arctic shrub increase.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31374
Appears in Collections:Master

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